High School To College Academic Planning

Our team provides students with the best resources regarding their college admissions. We help develop an academic plan that is both ideal and manageable.

Many students often overlook valuable opportunities that could increase their chances of college admission. By providing a trustworthy and informed platform for communication, our team will be able to help students make concrete decisions for their future.

academic planning for high schoolers who will undergo the college admissions process in the future

High School Academic Timeline

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Freshman Year

Freshman (9th grader) choosing high school courses to take
  • Join a Club
  • Plan for AP classes
  • Volunteer in Your Free Time
  • Learn a Sport or an Instrument
  • This is a good time to start SAT prep!

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Sophomore Year

Students take the PSAT and continue involvement in extracurriculars in sophomore year (10th grade)
  • Study for Your PSAT
  • Seek Out Leadership Positions in School
  • Participate in Summer Enrichment Programs

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Junior year

Junior (11th grade) students taking exams such as the AP or SAT and looking out for their GPA score

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Senior Year

Seniors (12th grade) undergo college admissions, with the college essay, and get ready to graduate

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Start Your New Journey!

High school students graduate with a diploma

Congratulations! You’ve arrived at the summit of your high school journey. Contact your chosen college in Spring and follow their orientation schedule to ensure a smooth transition into your next big journey!

Meet Our COLLEGE COUNSELING EXPERTS

Head Private English Tutor Truccey Nguyen-Do

Truccey Nguyen-Do

English Instructor & College Counselor

Truccey has over 7 years of experience tutoring SAT English, AP exams, and academic writing to students of all ages. She received her BA in History and minor in Japanese at San Jose State University. Truccey also assists students in planning and organizing their college admissions process where she provides guidance on researching universities and navigating the application procedures.

After graduation, she worked for two years as both English Teacher and Sales Marketer for a private school in Japan. After her time working abroad and in-state, she is experienced with working with students at all levels of English familiarity. She enjoys traveling and exploring new places, while also taking time for rest and relaxation at home with Hannibal the cat.

Jason morgan

College Essay Expert & Test Prep Instructor

Jason has twenty years of experience in the field of private tutoring and college counseling. He currently assists people on four different continents, and his clients have achieved acceptance to almost every exclusive university in the U.S. and Europe, including the Ivy League, Stanford, UC Berkeley, Northwestern, University of Chicago, Johns Hopkins, Sciences Po, HEC, Bocconi, Cambridge, and many others.

He regularly writes and updates educational books and curriculum, including several Princeton Review AP titles, and has published 40+ titles as an author and ghostwriter. He began his career at The Washington Post and later worked in script development in the Hollywood feature film industry.

English and Science Instructor Bryce Webster

Bryce Webster

English & Biology Instructor

Bryce graduated from Santa Clara University with a double major in Biology and Theater. She has experience with tutoring one-on-one and in groups of 5-10 for various AP classes. Bryce also focuses on proofreading essays, resumes, reports, and applications. She loves helping students actualize the well-polished, personal, and thought-out essays of their dreams. Many of her SAT and AP students eventually have her assist with the college application process.

Though her specialties lie in the two English-based exams as well as Biology and AP Environmental Science, Bryce enjoys reading and loves to work with younger students in literature-based settings. She is a firm believer that reading for fun or school makes you better in all parts of academia, not just in Literature.

Students and parents look at frequently asked questions about college admissions

Frequently Asked Questions

What courses do I need to take to be ready for college?

To be ready for college, it’s important to take a rigorous high school curriculum that prepares you for the academic demands of college. Most colleges expect applicants to have completed four years of English, four years of math (including algebra I and II, geometry, and pre-calculus or calculus), three to four years of science (including biology, chemistry, and physics), and three to four years of social studies (including U.S. history, world history, and government).

Additionally, it’s recommended to take foreign language courses to demonstrate language proficiency, as well as electives that align with your interests and intended major. Honors and Advanced Placement (AP) courses can also demonstrate your academic readiness for college and potentially earn you college credit. It’s important to challenge yourself academically while also maintaining a balance between extracurricular activities and a healthy lifestyle.

The AP courses you should take depend on your interests, intended major, and college goals. However, some popular and beneficial AP courses include AP English Language, AP Calculus, AP Biology, AP Chemistry, AP Physics, AP World History, and AP US History. These courses can not only demonstrate your academic abilities to college admissions officers but can also potentially earn you college credit and save you money on tuition. Before deciding which AP courses to take, research the requirements and expectations of the colleges you are interested in attending and consult with your high school counselor or teachers for guidance.

AP courses are beneficial for a variety of reasons. Firstly, they provide students with a challenging and rigorous academic curriculum that prepares them for the academic demands of college. Additionally, AP courses demonstrate to college admissions officers that students have the ability to handle college-level coursework and excel academically. Taking AP courses can also potentially earn students college credit, which can save them both time and money on tuition. Overall, AP courses are a great way for students to challenge themselves, demonstrate their academic abilities, and potentially earn college credit.

Participating in extracurricular activities can demonstrate your interests, skills, and leadership abilities to college admissions officers. While there is no one-size-fits-all answer to which extracurriculars are best, the key is to choose activities that align with your passions and showcase your unique strengths. This can include involvement in sports teams, music or theater productions, community service projects, academic clubs, or leadership positions in student government.

It’s also important to demonstrate consistent commitment and growth in your extracurricular activities, rather than trying to join as many clubs as possible. Ultimately, college admissions officers are looking for well-rounded students who can contribute to their campus community in meaningful ways, so choose extracurriculars that allow you to showcase your character and values.

Check out our blog post for more a comprehensive guide on what goes into a college application.

When it comes to GPA, there is no set number that all colleges are looking for. However, a higher GPA can increase your chances of being accepted into more competitive schools. Generally, colleges look for students who have maintained a consistent level of academic excellence throughout high school. This means taking challenging courses and earning good grades in them. While each college may have its own minimum GPA requirement, most consider a GPA of 3.0 or higher to be competitive. However, keep in mind that GPA is just one factor that colleges consider in their admissions decisions. They also look at test scores, extracurricular activities, essays, and other factors when evaluating applicants. So, while a high GPA is important, it’s not the only thing that matters when it comes to getting into college.

Read more about GPA: Weighted Vs. Unweighted on our blog.

Taking honors classes in high school can be a great way to challenge yourself academically and demonstrate your abilities to college admissions officers. Honors classes typically offer more advanced content and higher expectations than regular classes, allowing you to push yourself to excel in your studies. Additionally, earning good grades in honors classes can boost your GPA and improve your chances of being accepted into competitive colleges.

Since honors classes demonstrate that you are willing to take on challenges and seek out academic opportunities beyond the minimum requirements, they show that you are capable of handling more advanced and rigorous coursework, which can impress college admissions officers. Earning good grades in honors classes can also boost your GPA and make you a more competitive applicant for selective colleges.

However, it’s important to balance the rigor of honors classes with other commitments, such as extracurricular activities and social life, to avoid burnout. Ultimately, the decision to take honors classes should be based on your academic abilities, interests, and goals for the future.

Preparing for college doesn’t always have to involve on-campus activities. There are plenty of options that you can pursue from the comfort of your own home or during the summer break. These activities can help you stand out from college admissions officers and improve your chances of getting accepted.

First, you can start researching colleges and universities that interest you. You can explore their websites, review their admission requirements, and take virtual campus tours. You can also start working on your college application essays and personal statements. This will give you time to brainstorm ideas, revise your drafts, and seek feedback from others.

Additionally, you can take online courses or enroll in a summer program to develop new skills or deepen your knowledge in areas that interest you. Finally, you can volunteer or intern remotely for a local organization or business to gain hands-on experience and build your resume. These activities will not only help you stand out to college admissions officers but also enhance your personal and professional growth.

Preparing for college doesn’t always have to involve on-campus activities. There are plenty of options that you can pursue from the comfort of your own home or during the summer break. These activities can help you stand out from college admissions officers and improve your chances of getting accepted.

First, you can start researching colleges and universities that interest you. You can explore their websites, review their admission requirements, and take virtual campus tours. You can also start working on your college application essays and personal statements. This will give you time to brainstorm ideas, revise your drafts, and seek feedback from others.

Additionally, you can take online courses or enroll in a summer program to develop new skills or deepen your knowledge in areas that interest you. Finally, you can volunteer or intern remotely for a local organization or business to gain hands-on experience and build your resume. These activities will not only help you stand out to college admissions officers but also enhance your personal and professional growth.

Yes, there are numerous scholarships and awards available for students to apply for. Some scholarships are based on academic achievements, while others are awarded based on financial need, athletic abilities, or community service. Many organizations, including colleges and universities, private foundations, and corporations, offer scholarships and awards to support students’ educational goals. It’s important to research and apply for scholarships and awards as early as possible, as many have strict application deadlines. Some popular scholarship search engines include Fastweb, Scholarships.com, and Cappex.

Additionally, students should check with their school’s guidance office or financial aid office for local scholarship opportunities. By applying for scholarships and awards, students can reduce their overall college costs and potentially graduate debt-free.

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